The key of chatbots’ success is good CTAs.

Chatbots engage site visitors and help convert them into conversations, eventually leading to demos, meetings, and other engagement goals.

In a recent episode of Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman, Mark Bryson, consulting manager here at ChatFunnels, shared some best practices of how to construct your bots so they convert.

If you’re new to chatbots or looking to get started, read on to learn about how chatbot CTAs can greatly increase your conversion rates.

Best Practices

Here are the top 2 best practices when getting started with bots.

  1. Humanize the bot: Don’t have it be too robotic. You want people to feel connected to it. It should feel like a conversation over text. People are more likely to engage when the conversation with the bot can flow naturally.
  2. Match brand tone: The copy of the bot should match the messaging and tone of your website by using similar acronyms and jargon. If the tone of your site is more professional, then the bot should reflect that. If it’s more casual, the bot can be casual too.

CTAs

Should the bot’s call-to-actions be more aggressive to get them to convert, or should the bot be more focused on being helpful and contextual?

Either could work! You just need to know your audience.

It really depends on the intent of the visitor. High intent visitors will be ready for the book a demo CTA and low intent users will want the bots to be more of a guide.

You need to figure out what pages the high intent users are going to and what pages have more traffic of low intent users.

Usually pricing pages have higher intent prospects, so that bot’s CTA can be more direct.

Blog pages usually have lower intent visitors who wouldn’t want the bot to be super pushy.

CTA’s make a huge difference, so you need to make sure that the CTA of each bot on your website is tailored towards those who will most likely be interacting with that bot.

Types of Home Page Bots

The home page has the most traffic, so the chatbot should have a CTA that attracts all types of visitors.

Here are 4 examples of types of CTAs for the home page bot.

Type 1: Statistic

A statistic CTA is where you use a great statistic about the amazing performance of your product or the benefit of whatever your company has to offer. After all, people love numbers and they gravitate to them.

Some generic examples of statistic type CTAs include:

  • Want to maximize your sales by 60%?
  • Looking to increase your web traffic by 45%?
  • Are you ready to learn about how our product will get you 30% more leads per week?

Type 2: Pain Point Alleviation

You know the pain points that your potential customers have. You know what problems they need solved.

Have the bot lead with a question asking if they need help with “insert their specific pain point.”

These types of CTAs really speak to customers because everyone wants their problems solved fast.

This will make customers feel heard and understood, which will increase the likelihood of them engaging with the bot.

Type 3: Navigation

Another type of bot you could put on your home page is a navigation focused bot, meaning a bot that is there to help visitors find what they need on your website.

You could have the opening message be, “Hey, let me get you to where you want to be.”

The bot could ask them what they are looking for and offer some direction. Navigation bots relieve the customers’ stress of trying to find their way around your website. It helps customers and prospects quickly find what they’re looking for. Nowadays, people don’t have the patience to spend the time trying to navigate your site. It’s a great play to have a navigation bot on the home page.

Type 4: Pain Point/Value Add

This type of bot addresses their pain point, and then immediately offers a solution.

For example, the bot should say something along the lines of, “Are you trying to achieve X without having to go through Y?”

Essentially these CTAs should address a pain point and offer a solution right there.

Blog Page Bots

Bots on blog pages are definitely more for the top-of-the-funnel stages of the customer journey. However, it’s a great place to redirect visitors and get them to engage in a more personalized way.

Visitors on your blog page are probably still in the discovery phase. The bot should take that into consideration. The purpose of blog page bots is to keep prospects engaged and keep them reading your content.

Craft your CTA according to scroll percentage and time on page. If someone has stayed on the page for a little, you know they are at least somewhat interested. Then you can have the bot fire and say, “Did this have what you’re looking for?” or “Is there a different topic that interests you more that I can direct you to?”

Blog page bots should also ask about the visitor’s position at their company and recommend content based off that.

On every bot there can be CTAs at the end of the bot flow too such as buttons that say “I’m ready to book a demo.” That way, the prospects have the option to move down the funnel whenever they are ready.

Pricing Page Bots

Pricing page bots better be ready to convert. Very high intent users are on the pricing page.

When a potential customer is ready to buy, you know what is going through their head. Make sure the CTA grabs their attention and leads them to make the purchase.

Usually, the visitors on the pricing page want to talk to your team so be sure to have the bot give them the option to talk with an expert.

Product Page Bots

When someone is on the product page of your website, this shows that they are interested to some extent.

The main CTA that a bot on this page should have is something along the line of, “How can I help you learn more?”

When people are checking out your product, you want a bot to fire that will highlight all of its amazing features.

Demo Request Page

Depending on your company, product, and website, the demo request page could be a higher intent page than even the pricing page.

The bot on this page could say, “Hey, do you want to skip the form?”

This has proven to be extremely beneficial. No one likes filling out forms! You fill it out, send it in, and then have no clue as to when you will hear back from the company.

Skipping the form and scheduling a demo through a chatbot means there is no uncertainty/waiting period.

The customer feels more in control because they are the ones initiating the demo and choosing the time. It is also a much more interactive way to schedule a demo compared to filling out a form.

Conversation Reviews

In order to truly understand what type of CTAs are working, you need to conduct conversation reviews.

Conversation reviews include reading through each conversation that customers have had with each bot.

This allows you to review the bot flows and see what’s working and what’s not. As you read through the conversations, pay attention to exactly how people are responding to the chatbot. Tweak the bot copy as needed.

We can talk all day long about what we have seen that works best, but you need to be split testing in order to truly know what works for your company’s website.

Quick Recap:

Everyone should implement chatbots to their company’s website in order to make the customer journey much smoother.

And if you’re interested in setting up chatbots on your site, start your free trial with ChatFunnels today!

Bots on different pages of your website have different purposes and should therefore have unique CTAs specific to the type of visitors that would most likely be on that page.

Here’s a quick recap of each type of bot:

  • Home page bots: Chatbots on the home page could serve a couple different purposes. Their CTA could be an attention grabbing statistic or it could offer help navigating your site. It could also address pain points and add value.
  • Blog page bots: These bots should offer more content based off what the visitor is interested in. They should not be aggressive in their CTAs because those who are on the blog page are usually not super high intent visitors.
  • Pricing page bots: The pricing page bot should be geared towards getting them to talk with a team member. When they are on the pricing page, they are usually ready to buy.
  • Product page bots: A bot on the product page should help the visitors understand more about your product and what pains it will alleviate.
  • Demo request page bots: These bots should be constructed to fast track the process of scheduling demos. Let them skip the form and book a demo right through the bot.

Chatbot call-to-actions help send site visitors down your funnel and accelerate the conversion process.

If you’re interested in finding out what a bot can do for your website, book a demo with us today!